Last edited by Yozshujora
Wednesday, August 12, 2020 | History

3 edition of The Shakers, who they are and what they believe. found in the catalog.

The Shakers, who they are and what they believe.

by F. W. Evans

  • 396 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by s.n. in [Mt. Lebanon, N.Y .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Evans, F. W. 1808-1893 -- Correspondence.,
  • Hand, Sherman P. -- Correspondence.,
  • Shakers -- Doctrines.,
  • Shakers -- Correspondence.

  • Edition Notes

    GenreCorrespondence.
    ContributionsHand, Sherman P., MacLean, J. P. 1848-1939, former owner., Shaker Collection (Library of Congress)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBX9772 .E843
    The Physical Object
    Pagination12 p. ;
    Number of Pages12
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6889774M
    LC Control Number00526877

    III.—THE ORDER OF LIFE AMONG THE SHAKERS. A Shaker Society consists of two classes or orders: the Novitiate and the Church Order. There is a general similarity in the life of these two; but to the Novitiate families are sent all applicants for admission to the community or Church, and here they are trained; and the elders of these families also receive inquiring strangers, and stand in.   "The Shaker Cook Book, Not By Bread Alone" is by Caroline B. Piercy. Mrs. Piercy was born in Shaker Heights, Ohio and was one of the originators of the Shaker Historical Society. She, as her mother, loved everything Shaker. They especially loved the Shaker recipes for preparing foods. "For Shakers, preparing food was ever a joyous task.

    They actually DID derive from the QWuakers, so their theology is similar. THe differences is that, while the Quakers practiced quiet contemplation, the Shakers were very emotional. Otherwise, they were like many of the smaller Christian groups around in the 18th century. They wer anti-clergy, communalistic, and pre-millennial. The Shakers testify that they, as a people, find more pleasure and enjoyment — real good — arising from the celibate spiritual union of the sexes, and more of an absence of the afflictions and annoyances — real evil — arising from the generative union of the sexes, than, as they believe, is ever experienced in the order of the world.

    David McCullough is a Yale-educated, two-time recipient of both the Pulitzer Prize (Truman; John Adams) and the National Book Award (The Path Between the Seas; Mornings on Horseback). His many other highly-acclaimed works of historical non-fiction include The Greater Journey, , Brave Companions, The Great Bridge, The Wright Brothers, and /5(11). The Shakers reject the Trinity; instead they believe in a God made up of female and male elements reflected both in the supernatural and the real worlds. The requirement of celibacy is based on the belief that sin arose from Adam and Eve's sexual behavior in the Garden of Eden, although they do not feel that non-Shakers who marry and have.


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The Shakers, who they are and what they believe by F. W. Evans Download PDF EPUB FB2

They called themselves the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing, but because of their ecstatic dancing the world called them the Shakers. The Shakers were celibate, they did.

The Shakers, who they are and what they believe [F. W Evans] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : F. W Evans. The Shakers are a nearly-defunct religious organization whose formal name is the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second group grew out of a branch of Quakerism founded in England in by Jane and James Wardley.

Shakerism combined aspects of Quaker, French Camisard, and millennial beliefs and practices, along with the revelations of visionary Ann Lee.

Shaker Beliefs. The Shakers practiced communal living, where all property was shared. They didn’t believe in procreation, and therefore had to adopt children and recruit converts into their community. For those that were adopted, they were given a choice to either stay within the community or leave when they.

The Shakers. The Shakers were a unique Christian group who fled persecution in England, arriving in America in the 18th Century. They believed that their founder, Ann Lee, was the second coming of Christ. The Shakers believed that God had both male and female aspects, and practiced equality of men and women at all levels in their organization.

Beliefs: The Shakers held four basic beliefs: celibacy (they taught that sexual intercourse is the root of sin), Christian communion, confession of sin, and separation from the world.

The Quaker influence was seen in the form of pacifism, the rejection of. Shakers are probably best known today for their craftsmanship, simple way of communal living, and their history rather than the religious cult practices they established years ago.

There are just two Shakers left (as of ), both living in Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village in Maine. They had broken with the Society of Friends during the mid s. They believed that it was the Shakers' duty to actively seek converts.

The Shakers were originally known as Shaking Quakers, because they commonly trembled in religious fervor in their services. Inthe Shakers arrived in North America. Mother Ann Lee was their leader. Officially known as the United Society of Believers, they called themselves Shakers—but now, reports David Sharp for the Associated Press, the death of.

The Shakers’ mission was to live a perfect Christian life as portrayed in the Gospels and in the early Christian communities. The Shakers based their religion and their lives on celibacy, communal living, and the confession of sin. They attempted to attain spiritual and temporal simplicity, pacifism and perfection in all aspects of their lives.

Books shelved as shakers: A Simple Murder by Eleanor Kuhns, The Outsider by Ann H. Gabhart, The Visionist by Rachel Urquhart, Like the Willow Tree: The D. Stephen J. Stein, The Shaker Experience in America: A History of the United Society of Believers. Described as the “definitive history” of the people known as the “United Society of Believers in the First and Second Coming of Christ”-the Shakers, this work has stood the test of time.

Stein, a professor at Indiana University, systematically covers the full range of Shaker. The Shakers derived originally from a small branch of English Quakers founded by Jane and James Wardley in They may have adopted the French Camisards’ ritual practices of shaking, shouting, dancing, whirling, and singing in tongues.

The Shaker doctrine, as it came to be known in the United States, was formulated by Ann Lee, a textile worker in Manchester. Shakers believe that their founder, Mother Ann Lee, embodied the second coming of the Christ spirit as manifested on Earth.

How are the Shakers different from the Amish and the Quakers. The Shakers, Amish, and Quakers differ theologically and in the way they live. Unlike Shakers and Amish, the Quakers do not live in their own communities.

Quakers, or the Religious Society of Friends, was founded in England in the 17th century by George Fox and played a key role in abolition and women’s suffrage. With less than a dozen members left remaining, it is hard to believe that the Shakers once peopled eighteen thriving communities in several states.

Inthey numbered almost 4, members, and, over the years that they have been established in th e United States, more t Americans have lived a least some of their life as a Shaker. The Shakers is a documentary film directed by Tom Davenport and produced by Davenport and Frank DeCola.

It studies the last dozen remaining Shakers in their communities, focusing on their daily lives, music, and spirituality, as well as containing Shaker history and interviews with Shakers. It received positive reviews from critics, and won a Blue Ribbon at the American Film Festival.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk. Software. An illustration of two photographs. Shakers, who they are and what they believe. by Evans, F. (Frederick William).

They called themselves the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, but because of their ecstatic dancing, the world called them Shakers. Ken Burns creates a moving portrait of. When she first sent it to me, I wondered, at first, where she got the quote. Then I was like, oh yeah. From my book.

It can be interesting pulling out quote or line here and there from a book. Here are a few that were taken from my Shaker book, The Gifted for some kind of promotion. They sort of give you a quick view of some of the themes of.

The Early Shakers. Additional Background Information. At their peak productive, religious time, there were thousands of Shakers living in “order” at the various settlements.

They differed from other similar “Plain People” sects of their day [and to the present time], in one main point — the EARLY Shakers believed in and rigorously practiced sexual abstinence. The United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, commonly known as the Shakers, followed Mother Ann Lee to the United States in when life in England became difficult.

In the United States, they established several colonies whose governing principals included celibacy and agrarian communal living. Even at its peak, however, Shakerism claimed only about 4, members. I actually had the privilege of meeting two of the modern Shaker sisters in this film, and they had an aura about them of spiritual wholeness the contentment of choices in life that had turned out well.

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